The Exquisite Corpse / by Sergio Díaz De Rojas

By Blake Parker

The Exquisite Corpse, a collaborative and progressively evolving album released by Bigo & Twigetti in association with Moderna Records, is an extremely unconventional artistic project – in the best way possible. It represents musical prowess across the various artists that compose it, but it also represents something deeper, something that is largely lacking in music as of late: a strong sense of community.

The Exquisite Corpse is a result of multiple artists from both the Bigo & Twigetti team and the Moderna Records team, covering, remixing, and rehashing each other’s songs. What’s more, the album was released over time, track by track, as each new element was added to the musical collage. Since November of 2016 the album has been growing this way, and it finally rounded out in March with a full release and limited edition screen print posters.

The album encompasses many captivating songs, from the trudging rhythm of Ed Carlsen’s Loom, to the pitter-pattering of samples and keys in Lorenzo Masotto’s Oodaaq, to the creaky, city-esque soundscapes of Holkham’s The Exquisite Corpse for Accordion, Viola and Church Organ. But what’s more intriguing than each individual song is how the album functions as a whole. Much of the album’s concept recalls an oral history, passed down from generation to generation by word of mouth – sometimes warping or shifting slightly, but remaining true to the story’s original purpose. In another way, the album feels similar to a popular graffiti or street art wall, where image after image is sprayed onto concrete, overlapping and overtaking each other, until the paint layers are centimeters deep. But most of all, this album is a symbol of an ecosystem, a community in harmony with itself. While certain plants may flourish, they eventually die back and provide nutrients for the next wave of leaves, reaching ever towards the sun. 


Stream and download The Exquisite Corpse on Bandcamp and Spotify.